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Before 13-year-old Rosalie Avila hanged herself in her own Yucaipa, California, bedroom recently, she left several notes for her family to read when they found her body.

“She left one observe that was in my wife, and it said, ‘I love you, mom. I’m sorry you’re gonna find me such as this,’ ” Rosalie’s father, Freddie Avila, tells PEOPLE. “Another note said, ‘Please, don’t post any pictures of me inside my funeral.’ Those were her goodbye notes.”

Rosalie’s family found Rosalie unresponsive on Nov. 28, in just a minute Freddie says he’ll never forget.

“There was music playing and her door was locked. I knew something was wrong because she wasn’t responding,” Avila says from the moments after he and Rosalie’s siblings returned home. “My son ended up picking the lock to get in there and every one of them went in there and just screamed. I ran towards the room and my daughter was hanging there around the rope. Individuals were hysterical.”

Avila says he gave Rosalie CPR for what appeared like a “lifetime” – “I was screaming, ‘Come on, Rose. I love you. Please.’ “

“I was hoping and praying this isn’t happening, but it happening. And it’s horrible.”

Rosalie was declared brain dead on Dec. 1 and was taken off of life support 72 hours later. Based on the family, Rosalie’s suicide attempt followed months of relentless bullying. Avila says Yucaipa-Calimesa School District officials did nothing to safeguard the teen.

“She said, ‘They’re calling us a whore. They’re saying which i have herpes,’ and other bad stuff,” Avila tells PEOPLE. “They made fun of her teeth, everything about her. And she or he left a bunch of notes, they called her ugly and she had ones of her looking in the mirror saying, ‘Ugly.’ Everything they told her, she believed.”

As the bullying continued, Rosalie began cutting herself, Avila tells PEOPLE. The household now intends to file a wrongful death lawsuit against the school district because of its “negligence and failure to consider appropriate measures to guard Rosalie like a victim of bullying and ensure her safety.”

“The school was also negligent in failing to take action from the bullies and letting them continue within their relentless verbal abuse of Rosalie understanding the frail condition she was at,” the family’s attorney, Brian Claypool, announced inside a statement.

“In addition to the verbal abuse, classmates circulated a relevant video portraying what an ugly girl looked like and just what a pretty girl looked like and used an image of Rosalie to portray the ugly girl,” Claypool said. “The video was circulated throughout the school and online, going viral. In her suicide note, Rosalie apologized to her parents to be ugly.”

The?Yucaipa-Calimesa Joint Unified School District released an argument on Dec. 1 confirming Avila’s death, noting that “The District Board of Education, its administration, and staff are united in care and concern for all those affected by this tragedy.”

“The communities of Yucaipa and Calimesa have proven to be caring, united, active, supportive communities in all manner of events, whether joyful or sorrowful,” the statement, that was shared by KTLA, also said partly. “The District earnestly believes and hopes that those qualities will continue arrive at bear because we are all committed to the well-being and support of everybody in the YCJUSD family.”

The superintendent from the Yucaipa-Calimesa Joint Unified School District also issued an argument saying “we will work closely with detectives – in their investigation into allegations of bullying. This issue requires all of us to work together, to watch for signs and intervene whenever we see problems,” according to CBS La.

The district did not react to PEOPLE’s request comment.

Avila describes the weeks since Rosalie’s death as “the worst ride ride of my entire life.” He says he and his wife, Charlene, are heartbroken and going to hold the school district accountable “to make sure my daughter’s life isn’t meaningless.”

“I feel just heartbroken. Everything That i have ever wanted for her are gone,” Charlene says. “I’m never gonna see her graduate high school. I’m never gonna see her find yourself getting married and have children. I’m never gonna celebrate her birthdays. Christmas is in a few days and i am not gonna have my daughter with us for Christmas. I’ll never ever function as the same, but I will remain strong in my other children.”

The family members have generate a GoFundMe page to cover expenses.